Douglas Krantz - Technical Writer - Describing How It Works
Get the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire Alarms
This website uses cookies. See Privacy for details.

When Talking to Customers, Shouldn't Their Language Be Used?

When talking to non-fire alarm trained maintenance or management people, use language they understand instead of the "Industry Specific" language used around the shop. They will appreciate talking as an equal, not being talked down to.

You have been trained in the operation of fire alarm systems, your customers have not... at least not to your extent.
Use language that can be understood by your customers - maintenance personnel or management. Instead of AFA say smoke detector, instead of NAC say Horn or Strobe, Instead of...


By Douglas Krantz

You have been trained in the operation of fire alarm systems, your customers have not... at least not to your extent.

But your customers still want to know, at least as far as how it affects them, how the fire alarm system works. The more they know, the better they can do their job (usually).

In Toastmasters International, an organization that teaches public speaking, we are taught to increase the listener's knowledge and understanding. If those listening can have their understanding increased even a little, they are better off.

It isn't expected that anyone can make a nuclear power plant engineer from a school custodian. However, if they're interested, you still can leave your customers with an improved understanding of the fire alarm system. Then they, in turn, when you aren't there, can do a better job when dealing with the system.

Of course, this advice has to be balanced with the knowledge that some people will use the information you give them and wreak havoc with the fire alarm system through partial knowledge and the desire to "do-it-themselves."

Just watch out for these people and give whatever understanding you can give of the fire alarm system without giving away the ability to "wreak havoc."
Based on his electronics training, and his understanding of Life Safety, Douglas Krantz has compiled his knowledge of Conventional Fire Alarm Systems into the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire Alarms. The book covers the basics of the Conventional Fire Alarm System, and shows how Life Safety and internal supervision affects the fire alarm system.

Douglas Krantz -- Fire Alarm Engineering Technician, Electronic Designer, Electronic Technician, Writer

See how Class A Wiring works

Share This With Friends:

Go to the Fire Alarm Description Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Residential Life Safety Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Residential Life Safety Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Fire Alarm Description Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the General Electrical Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Fire Alarm Maintaining Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Fire Suppression Map Page of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
Go to the Guest Writer's Guidelines of Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
See Trivia on Douglas Krantzs Technicians Corner
This website uses cookies. See Privacy for details.
Get the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire AlarmsGet the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire AlarmsGet the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire AlarmsGet the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire AlarmsGet the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire Alarms
Short Circuit

Uncomplicating Fire Alarm Systems - One Article at a Time

Keep up on the latest article!




No Charge - Unsubscribe Anytime


Get the book Make It Work - Hunting Ground FaultsGet the book Make It Work - Hunting Ground FaultsGet the book Make It Work - Hunting Ground FaultsGet the book Make It Work - Hunting Ground FaultsGet the book Make It Work - Hunting Ground Faults