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Can a Control Module & Pull Station Address be Sequential?

Can a Control Module & Pull Station be Sequential (M001-M002)?


Greetings Douglas,

Before presenting myself, I want to thank you for your support and your help that you're provided to learners. I've really learned a lot from your lessons.

I'm a telecommunication engineer. I've recently start a new job with a construction & engineering company. Low current will be handled by me (Fire alarm, CCTV. Etc...) I don't have a lot of experience with fire alarm as it's my first experience with it.

I wonder if I can ask you some technical questions. Here are some issues I'm not sure about:
  • Can the Control Module & Manual Pull Station be labelled with the same code sequentially (M001-M002)?
  • What is the more reliable detector used in fire water pump house, smoke detectors or heat detectors?
  • Are heat detectors reliable for use in oil drum storage shelters?
  • What are the detectors used in Gas stations?
  • In hazardous areas, can manual pull stations & horns be used instead of explosion-proof MCPs (Pull Stations) & explosion-proof horns?

Your answer shall be appreciated.

Thank you, K C

  • Can the Control Module & Manual Pull Station be labelled with the same code sequentially (M001-M002)?

The M001, M002, M003, Mxxx, is the software definition of specific inputs or outputs from the fire alarm panel. "M" probably stands for "Module". The numbers "001", "002", "003", etc. module number assigned on the addressing thumbwheel or dip-switch of the module, or programmed into the module using a programming tool, or by the panel.

Instead of an "M", detectors may have a different letter like a "D" or "S".

The "M" number is what the panel uses to communicate with the module programmed with the same number.

Each manufacturer of fire alarm systems has a different set of rules regarding this, so check with the technical support people for manufacturer.



  • What is the more reliable detector used in fire water pump house, smoke detectors or heat detectors?
  • Are heat detectors reliable for use in oil drum storage shelters?
  • What are the detectors used in Gas stations?
  • In hazardous areas, can manual pull stations & horns be used instead of explosion-proof MCPs (Pull Stations) & explosion-proof horns?

These questions are outside of my expertise. The rules and codes will give some guidance, but to get specific answers, you may have to talk to others in the field, and to the fire marshal or other Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ).

Recommended Reading

I really, really recommend purchasing the "NFPA 72 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code Handbook". It has the complete official NFPA 72 Code, and included along with the Code are lots of explanations about what the Code means.

Basically, explaining what the fire alarm system should look like, the NFPA 72 Code itself is legal-talk; explaining what the NFPA means with the legal-talk, the Handbook has added comments (using terms that even I can understand) to help show what the Code means. They even use illustrations.

Yes, the Handbook is more expensive. However, to get an understanding of what is meant by the legal terms shown in the codebook, the added explanations are worth much more than the extra expense.

The Handbook is available in hardbound, in softbound, or even in electronic form for desktop or mobile devices on the official NFPA website --- https://catalog.nfpa.org

Douglas Krantz
Based on his electronics training, and his understanding of Life Safety, Douglas Krantz has compiled his knowledge of Conventional Fire Alarm Systems into the book Make It Work - Conventional Fire Alarms. The book covers the basics of the Conventional Fire Alarm System, and shows how Life Safety and internal supervision affects the fire alarm system.

Douglas Krantz -- Fire Alarm Engineering Technician, Electronic Designer, Electronic Technician, Writer

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